Monday, January 31, 2011

Book 27


From Amazon.com: Seventeen-year-old Jenna Fox awakens after more than a year in a coma to find herself in a life—and a body—that she doesn't quite recognize. Her parents tell her that she's been in an accident, but much of her past identity and current situation remain a mystery to her: Why has her family abruptly moved from Boston to California, leaving all of her personal belongings behind? Why does her grandmother react to her with such antipathy? Why have her parents instructed her to make sure not to tell anyone about the circumstances of their move? And why can Jenna recite whole passages of Thoreau's Walden, but remember next to nothing of her own past? As she watches family videos of her childhood, strange memories begin to surface, and she slowly realizes that a terrible secret is being kept from her. Pearson has constructed a gripping, believable vision of a future dystopia. She explores issues surrounding scientific ethics, the power of science, and the nature of the soul with grace, poetry, and an apt sense of drama and suspense. Some of the supporting characters are a bit underdeveloped, but Jenna herself is complex, interesting, and very real. This is a beautiful blend of science fiction, medical thriller, and teen-relationship novel that melds into a seamless whole that will please fans of all three genres.


Clearly, I enjoy young adult fiction. Because I work with children, I feel as though I should read their books and in all honesty, some young adult books are far more though provoking than "grown up" books.

This book has almost 5 stars on amazon which is why I decided to read it. I'm not sure that I would give this book 5 stars, but it was an interesting read. This story wasn't really a mystery nor is it full of suspense, but it does make you think about the future.

Does anyone else love young adult fiction?

6 comments:

Amie said...

YES! It's practically all I ever read. I have yet to get into adult fiction, I still feel like I'm too young to really connect with/get into it. However, I did just buy my first set of "real grown up girl books" We'll see how that goes!

Sonya said...

You know I love young adult books! They are so well written and usually a pretty quick read!

Laurie said...

I honestly don't even think about genre when I decide to read a book, or series of books. Why get hung up on it? Sometimes you just want to read something fun. Who cares? If someone refers something to me, I'll 9 times out of 10, read it.
Using Twilight as an example. The Twilight series was referred to me by another adult, not a teen. And I know many adults who have read them. I'm the one that referred it to MY teen, hahaha.
I don't understand why people get hung up on it. Read what you want, eh?

Jackie said...

I read this on the train when we went to NYC before Christmas and thought it was good. I actually thought of you while I was reading it because I know you are my YA fiction partner in crime. Haha :)

hotpants™ said...

All I've been reading lately is Young Adult fiction. They're better than half of the adult books I read. Maybe it's because I still think of myself as a teen...

Nap Mom said...

No. I don't read YA Fiction but I probably should. I have a middle school aged daughter and I think this is a tough age to find books for. She is too old for much of the age 9-12 books but I think that some of the teen fiction is too much. Maybe I am being a protective mother. I am going to dive into some of your recommendations to see if I can find a few gems for my preteen (but not a preteen for much longer).